drink driving legal advice

How much is ‘too much’ when drinking alcohol before driving?

When you’re in charge of a vehicle there is one thing that everyone is now aware of – driving and drinking do not mix. There have been many awareness raising campaigns in recent years that have spelt out the dangers of drinking and driving, which means that there is now a much greater knowledge of how serious it is.

The government has set guidelines that outline the safe alcohol limit and driving. If you do decide that you will consume a small amount of alcohol, keeping under the legal limits, then it is important to know exactly what this equates to.

The legal alcohol limit and driving

The law states that “in England and Wales, the alcohol limit for drivers is 80 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood, 35 microgrammes per 100 millilitres of breath or 107 milligrammes per 100 millilitres of urine. In most other European countries, the limit is less, usually 50 milligrammes per 100 millilitres of blood.”

This doesn’t make a great deal of sense to the average person, so it is important that this is translated into terms that can be more easily understood. As a rule of thumb, this roughly translates to two pints of average (3.5 – 4%) strength beer/ale/lager. If you’re drinking premium drinks with a higher ABV (pints at 5%, 6%, wine, spirits etc) then this rule won’t apply.

It is also important to remember that not everyone breaks down alcohol at the same rate. Factors such as age, weight, gender, whether or not you have eaten and how frequently you consume alcohol can all affect how you feel once you have had a drink. If you are legally allowed to drink an amount that you know personally will have an effect on you then it is best to avoid it all together. Just because it is legal doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the right choice for you.

Best approach is to play it safe – don’t drink and drive

If you’re planning on driving anywhere, even if it is just a mile or two, the best thing to do with regards to drinking alcohol is to avoid it all together. This will mean that there is no question that your driving abilities or reactions are impaired. If you should happen to be involved in an accident, then you will know with a clear conscience that alcohol was not a contributing factor.

Drink driving is one of the most serious motoring and at Motoring Defence we always recommend you seek legal advise as soon as possible. Call 0800 612 4859 to speak to one of our team, 24/7.

A Court
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Another Not Guilty In Salisbury

The firm’s biggest traffic case of the year ended in a not guilty verdict at Salisbury Crown Court.

A serving army officer was accused of causing death by careless driving following a fatal collision involving the client’s car and a van.

Our team supported the client from the initial police interview, through the Magistrates Court and on to a jury trial.

We were able to use independent experts to show the Jury that our client was within the speed limit and it was far more likely that a third vehicle was driven badly and caused the accident.

This was a great result as our client had suffered significant brain damage in the accident and had little recollection of the day in question.

It was therefore all about the technical know-how and expert evidence.

 

Pete Gotch
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Victory at Leamington Magistrates Court

Congratulations to Pete Gotch on his recent victory at Leamington Magistrates Court.

Pete was defending a young man charged with drink driving. He was facing the possibility of a ban and the loss of his job. Pete argued that the client had returned to the car to get some medication and had not driven the car whilst drunk. The client was acquitted.

The client remarked: ‘that was the best money I’ve ever spent!’

Pete also had success at Banbury Magistrates defending a no insurance and no driving license case. He successfully argued mistaken identity. Evidence was produced suggesting that someone had given the client’s name when stopped. The client was found not guilty.

Pete also had success at Banbury Magistrates defending a no insurance and no driving license case. He successfully argued mistaken identity. Evidence was produced suggesting that someone had given the client’s name when stopped. The client was found not guilty.

Charlotte de Rosnay
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Trial Discontinued

Well done to Charlotte de Rosnay on her latest traffic case. Charlotte found so many holes in the Crown’s case that the matter was discontinued at the first hearing without the need for a trial.